Maori enterprises/geo-units and Employee counts: 2010-2017 (6,7,8,9,10,11,12)

All data used for this page are secondary and were drawn from multiple sources. Aggregated information/data was taken from government, regional council, iwi, Statistics New Zealand and independent, commissioned reports. We also used online SNZ business and NZ Census based statistical tables/databases for broad picture analyses.  Information about the birth, death, and survival rates, industry types[1] employment rate[2], and workforce size data of all individual Māori enterprises over the 2010-2017 period were taken from Business Register datasets held in the Statistics New Zealand Integrated Data Infrastructure (IDI) resource. We also accessed New Zealand Census datasets from the IDI to examine small Māori businesses and employee levels, sole traders/self-employed and who did not fall within the SNZ Business Register criteria[3]. All data sets were checked for errors and congruence. Analysis was undertaken using a series of bivariate and multivariate calculations. The lack of sampling and statistical significance tests were precluded given the census nature and complete data sets.

 

 

1.  Geographic units belonging to economically significant enterprises; economically significant enterprises are generally defined as enterprises  with GST turnover greater than $30,000 per year. Based on data from the February reference month.

2.  Filled job figures are sourced from linked employer-employee data (March quarter).

3. Māori authorities are geographic units belonging to economically significant enterprises, identified as Māori by the Business Register.

4.  South Island comprises the West Coast, Canterbury, Otago, Southland, Tasman, Nelson, and Marlborough regions.

5.  These figures are provisional.

6   An enterprise is treated as a Māori enterprise if it meets one (or more) of these conditions:- it is an enterprise (business) with a collectively managed asset that uses current Inland Revenue eligibility criteria to be a Māori authority (whether or not it elects to be a Māori authority for tax purposes)- it is a commercial business that supports the Māori authority’s business and social activities, and sustains or builds a Māori authority’s asset base - it is a business that is 50 percent or more owned by Māori authorities.

7.   Enterprises: A business or service entity operating in New Zealand. It can be a company, partnership, trust, estate, incorporated society, producer board, local or central government organisation, voluntary organisation or self-employed individual.

8.   An enterprise is treated as a Māori enterprise if it meets one (or more) of these conditions:

9.   Enterprises: A business or service entity operating in New Zealand. It can be a company, partnership, trust, estate, incorporated society, producer board, local or central government organisation, voluntary organisation or self-employed individual.

10.   ANZSIC06 category according to the predominant activity it is engaged in. ANZSIC06 is a hierarchical classification with four levels: division, subdivision, group, and class.

11.   Employee Count (EC): Employee count is a head-count of all salary and wage earners for the February reference month.

12.   An enterprise must meet at least one of the following criteria: posted annual expenses or sales subject to GST of more than $30,000, employee count of greater than three, part of a group of enterprises, registered for GST and involved in agriculture or forestry- over $40,000 of income recorded in the IR10 annual tax return (this includes some units in residential property leasing and rental) (SNZ 2013).

Note: Due to rounding, figures may not sum to the stated total(s).

Source: Statistics New Zealand